Shrunken Cinema/Termite Terrace/Bugs Bunny Rides Again

From Eccentric Flower

Bugs Bunny Rides Again

1947

Summary: Yosemite Sam comes into town looking for the varmint who can tame him. That varmint is a rabbit.

Director: Friz Freleng

Writer: Tedd Pierce & Michael Maltese

Featuring: Bugs Bunny; Yosemite Sam.

Onreel

0:19 Sound cue: Overture from "William Tell."

0:31 Sound cue as we show the town full of gunfire: "Cheyenne."

0:49 When we cut to the shot of the Gunshot Saloon, we hear another version of "Cheyenne" on barroom piano. (IMDb seems to think this is "Navajo" by the same composer, but it just sounds like "Cheyenne" again to me - unless the two songs are very similar.)

1:02 Sound cue as Yosemite Sam makes his entrance: "Die Erlkönig" or something that sounds a lot like it. Compare to the suspense music under the high dive patter in High Diving Hare.

1:07 About Sam's "namby-pamby" line see Offreel.

1:45 Graffiti carved in the doorframe: The credits above should tell you who "Mike," "Friz," and "Tedd" are. "P.J" is background artist Paul Julian.

1:57 The music as Bugs and Sam stride toward each other ("Just like Gary Cooper, huh?"), under the jangle of boot spurs neither is wearing, is credited in some sources as a bit of Rossini; I didn't think it was worth digging further.

2:22 But what's under "This town ain't big enough for the two of us" (and the subsequent hammering and sawing) is definitely a snippet of Beethoven's "Pathétique."

3:03 Sound cue: Carl Stalling's soft-shoe music. See comments at Stage Door Cartoon. "Ken Champin Veterinary" in the background is one of the cartoon's animators. You have to be real fast to also catch "G. Chiniquy Blacksmith" (animator Gerry Chiniquy), because it's only seen as Sam is dancing into the mine shaft.

4:50 Sound cue: It's amazing the number of people who have used the "William Tell" overture as a cue for some sort of horse race.

5:55 Sound cue during card game: "My Little Buckaroo."

6:24 Sound cue: "Cheyenne" again.

6:45 Sound cue when the car is revealed to be full of bathing beauties: "Oh! You Beautiful Doll." The train, by the by, is labelled "Sue City [Sioux City] and Great Divide R.R."

6:57 Sound cue as train leaves: "Aloha Oe."

Offreel

Various signs, notably on the train depot, cue us that the name of the town in this cartoon is Rising Gorge, which is a plausible geographical monicker (gorge as in ravine) but is also an old descriptive phrase for a disgusted reaction, specifically the feeling that one is about to throw up. Both uses of "gorge" derive from the French for "throat."

When Sam enters the bar he says a line about being the roughest hombre west of the Rio Grande - "and I ain't no namby-pamby." This line has been redubbed. Originally the rhyming line was "And I don't mean Mahatma Gandhi." The prevalent theory about the redub is that Gandhi was assassinated in January of 1948, and the line was changed out of sensitivity in subsequent releases - although this makes one wonder why the cartoon ever got released with the original line (the cartoon wasn't released until June 1948). Yet it clearly was; versions with the original line exist in the wild (this YouTube clip will show it, assuming it's still up).

The Golden Collection version, while it restores a number of gunplay gags that had been censored in various airings from time to time, retains the "namby-pamby" line. Frankly, it makes more sense than the Gandhi joke did anyway.

« Termite Terrace

Personal tools
eccentric flower
fiction